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The effect of soil disinfection with selected chemicals on the growth and development of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolium L.)

Barbara Kołodziej

Department of Industrial and Medicinal Plants
Agricultural University of Lublin
Akademicka 15, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
e-mail: Barkol@agros.ar.lublin.pl

American ginseng is a fleshy rooted, herbaceous, perennial plant found in hardwood forests throughout the eastern United States and southern Canada. It has been cultivated in North America and lately in Asia, Australia, and Europe. The aim of the presented experiment was to determine the effect of soil disinfection with Previcur (0.2%), Basamid (180 g m-3), and formaldehyde (2%) on growth, development, and disease infestation of American ginseng through six years of vegetation. The field experiment was carried out on sandy-loam soil. On plots where the soil was disinfected with Basamid the seeds did not germinate and this pesticide had to be excluded from the experiment. Disinfectants (apart from Basamid) used in the experiment markedly protected seedlings from diseases, resulting in a higher plant population and better growth and development of the plants. Disinfectants used did not affect average root weight, but caused significant differences in root yielding. Objects disinfected with formaldehyde were characterized by significantly higher yields in comparison with Previcur and especially control plots.

Kołodziej B., 2002. The effect of soil disinfection with selected chemicals on the growth and development of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolium L.). Folia Horticulturae 14/2: 177-182.